hydrus server running on Debian
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.
 
 
imtbl 33908b7c5f
docs: add note about the project being unmaintained
2 months ago
deb feat: Update base image to Debian Buster 2 years ago
hydrus@0db1e67666 feat: update hydrus server version 2 months ago
.dockerignore feat: Decrease Docker image size 2 years ago
.editorconfig feat: Add initial version 2 years ago
.gitmodules feat: Update hydrus server version 2 years ago
.travis.yml feat: Add initial version 2 years ago
CHANGELOG.md docs: update changelog for release 4.4.0 2 months ago
Dockerfile chore: update dependencies 2 months ago
LICENSE chore: switch to AGPLv3 7 months ago
README.md docs: add note about the project being unmaintained 2 months ago
docker-cmd-start.sh chore: remove ability to define custom UID/GID at container creation 1 year ago

README.md

hydrus-server-docker hydrus server version Build status Docker Hub build

hydrus server running on Debian

Unmaintained: this project is no longer maintained. I suggest you check out suika/hydrus as an alternative (Docker images for both hydrus client and server are provided).

This is a simple Debian-based Docker setup for running hydrus server from source.

The latest build runs hydrus server version 430.

Table of contents

Install

The easiest way to install is via Docker Hub:

[email protected]:~$ docker pull mtbl/hydrus-server-docker

By default, this will pull the latest build. To specify an image with a specific version of hydrus server, provide the version number as tag, e.g.:

[email protected]:~$ docker pull mtbl/hydrus-server-docker:430

Alternatively, you can also build the image yourself:

[email protected]:~$ git clone --recurse-submodules https://github.com/imtbl/hydrus-server-docker.git
[email protected]:~$ cd hydrus-server-docker
[email protected]:hydrus-server-docker$ docker build . -t hydrus-server-docker

The user that is used inside the container has UID 1000 and GID 1000 by default. You can adjust this (e.g., to match your host UID/GID) by providing the arguments USER_ID and GROUP_ID when making a build.

Dependencies

Updating

If you have installed via Docker Hub, just pull the updated image. Otherwise, pull from this repository and make a new build.

This repository follows semantic versioning and any breaking changes that require additional attention will be released under a new major version (e.g., 2.0.0). Minor version updates (e.g., 1.1.0 or 1.2.0) are therefore always safe to simply install via the routine mentioned before.

When necessary, this section will be expanded with upgrade guides to new major versions.

Upgrading from 3.x to 4.x

Upgrading from 3.x to 4.x can be done via pulling the updated image from Docker Hub or building it yourself and requires no further manual changes.

4.0.0 has introduced no breaking changes and merely reflects the switch to a new license (AGPLv3).

Upgrading from 2.x to 3.x

Upgrading from 2.x to 3.x can be done via pulling the updated image from Docker Hub or building it yourself and requires no further manual changes.

Due to the introduction of OpenCV to hydrus server (which is hard to build on Alpine), the Docker image is now based on Debian instead of Alpine.

Upgrading from 1.x to 2.x

Upgrading from 1.x to 2.x can be done via pulling the updated image from Docker Hub or building it yourself and requires no further manual changes.

Since there have been issues with running the pre-compiled version of hydrus server 335+ (which made the switch to Python 3) on the previous Docker setup, starting with 2.0.0, the Docker image is now based on Alpine (instead of Debian) and runs hydrus server from source.

This approximately halves the resulting image size while at the same time making it easier to adapt for future changes/dependencies.

Usage

Ports

First, you need to bind the exposed ports. This can be done automatically using -P but it is recommended to bind them manually instead since having changing ports every time you run a new container might be annoying when used in combination with other services.

hydrus-server-docker exposes the following three ports by default:

  • 45870/tcp
  • 45871/tcp
  • 45872/tcp

These are used to access the different services. 45870 is the default port for the server administration service while 45871 and 45872 are used for repositories. You will generally have two (one for tags and one for files), but if you add more, you will also need to expose additional ports.

Storage

Per default, hydrus-server-docker stores its databases and media inside the /data directory which is a mount point that is persisted as a volume. A new volume will be created every time a container is created, making it less ideal as a long-term solution. Instead, you should create a named volume yourself and mount that over it:

[email protected]:~$ docker volume create hydrus-server-data

After creating your named volume, you can run the container. Here is a full example with all the options mentioned above:

[email protected]:~$ docker run -p 45870:45870 -p 45871:45871 -p 45872:45872 -v hydrus-server-data:/data -d mtbl/hydrus-server-docker

Specifying the same named volume every time a container is created gives each of these instances access to the same persisted data.

Of course, using a bind mount instead of a named volume is also possible but for performance reasons only recommended if you need easy access to the data on the host machine.

Maintainer

imtbl

Contribute

You are welcome to help out!

Open an issue or submit a pull request.

License

AGPLv3 © imtbl